INSTALLATION NOTICE

As of today, 1 Stop Generator Shop is continuing to move forward with all installations for as long as we can!

Several municipality Building Departments have begun focusing on essential work only. While some have reduced employees to a skeleton staff, others are performing inspections virtually and by photographs, and a few have closed. If your permits have not yet been approved, we cannot guarantee they will be ready by your install date and we may need to move your install. We have not received any cancellation notices from FPL yet. However, we will be sure to keep you informed as changes continue to occur.

Currently, WE ARE NOT RESCHEDULING ANY PREVIOUSLY CONFIRMED APPOINTMENTS BY HOMEOWNER REQUEST. Any appointment/s that a homeowner cancels will be taken off our calendar and moved to later date, possibly into the summer months, as our current schedule is now into June/July appointments.

It has become difficult trying to keep track of each municipality and to accommodate all the changes. If the Building Departments force changes due to the Coronavirus, you will be notified by us, at that time.

We apologize for any inconvenience and appreciate your understanding and patience as we all work through this together.

CORONAVIRUS NOTICE

To our valued customers

As communities begin to feel the impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19), I want to share with you the steps we’re taking at 1 Stop Generator Shop to help protect the health and safety of our customers and associates, which are always our top priorities.

We’re closely monitoring local and national reports on the evolving impact of COVID-19, and based on guidance from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the World Health Organization and applicable public health agencies, we’ve developed plans and established a task force that will allow us to respond timely and appropriately.

Our housekeeping and sanitization efforts in our warehouses and work vehicles have been greatly expanded. We’re frequently disinfecting often-touched surfaces, such as, door handles, countertops, keypads, restroom surfaces and common areas. We’re asking all of our associates (and we urge everyone) to follow the CDC guidelines to prevent the spread of the infection.

We feel deeply for those who have been affected. Thankfully, as of now, we’re not aware of any associate contracting COVID-19. However, we have implemented guidelines that instruct any associate who may develop symptoms or come into contact with infected individuals, to stay home and follow the CDC’s instructions. Any impacted associates will be compensated for their missed work hours.

At this time, all of our jobs are open for business during our regular hours to meet the needs of our customers. If we become aware of any condition, in any way, that would make it unsafe, please rest assured that we will close until those conditions have been addressed.

Again, the health and safety of our customers and associates are our top priorities and we’re committed to doing our part to help keep you safe.

Stay safe and well.

Yours Sincerely,

Jon Andio

President of 1 Stop Generator Shop

Large Backup Generator Installation

Recent large backup generator installation photos show that no job is too big for 1 Stop Generator. This installation behind a local business was quite a job – requiring a crane to lift the unit and its attached fuel storage into place.

1 Stop Generator Donates 36 Christmas Trees

The 1 Stop Generator shop team recently volunteered to help out the local charity Light of the World Brigade,  donating 36 Christmas trees and decorations to the homeless shelter The Lord’s Place. Find out more, and how to help at – thelordsplace.org

Mike Fatig, founder of Light of the World Brigade wrote:
“Jon and Jess we could not serve the community the way we do if not for your generosity and support. So grateful. For those that don’t know the 1 Stop Generator Shop provides us with a warehouse, we call it our Joy Factory, and their employees wrap gifts, decorate trees, and serve with us in the community.”

1 Stop Generator Donates

Choosing a Home Standby Generator

Choosing a Home Standby Generator

Choosing a Home Standby Generator is easier than you think and is a great investment:
Safety – No gasoline cans or extension cords, reducing risk of fire, CO poisoning and electrical shock while facilitating the operation of security systems, air conditioning, refrigeration and powering medical devices.
Convenience – Provide peace of mind, even when you’re away. Power will automatically be restored to critical systems or the entire house. Continue watching the game or working on your PC, like nothing ever happened!
Value – A standby generator is an investment that pays for itself and increases the resale value of your home. It delivers the cleanest power possible for sensitive electronics found in today’s homes.

The 3 Steps for Choosing a Home Standby Generator 

  1. Pick a Fuel Source – Standby generators up to 22kW mostly use natural gas (NG) or liquid propane (LP). If you’re looking for a generator that runs on diesel, you’ll need to upgrade to a liquid-cooled whole-house type that may cost more. Both LP and diesel fuels will require tanks large enough to properly run the generator. NG unites will require the natural gas meter and gas lines be the correct size. Your contractor will verify this with you prior to installation and you can find this information in the installation manual.
  2. Determine Power Needs – Determine exactly how much power you’ll actually need during an outage and whether or not you want to only back up crucial systems like refrigerators and lighting or the entire house. The best way to determine the power needs of your home is to first decide if you want to power your central air conditioner or HVAC equipment during a blackout since it is the most power-hungry appliances in your home. How can you tell what size you need? Look at your air conditioning unit’s data plate and it will tell you the size in either BTUs or Tons. There are 12,000 BTUs for each ton of capacity and 3.517 Kilowatts of energy. So for example, if you have a 3-ton (36,000BTU) air conditioner, it will require a standby generator that is 11kW or larger just to run the AC unit. (3T x 3.517kw = 10.551 or 11kw)
  3. Choose a Transfer Switch – An automatic transfer switch (ATS) allows your generator to automatically spring into action the moment a power failure is detected. It does this by continuously sensing utility power. After an outage is detected, it starts the engine and disconnects power coming from the utility line, powering your home through generator power. Getting the right switch is just as crucial as getting the right generator as they work together to restore power. You will need to know the amperage of your electrical service panel. You can check this by locating the main breaker in your electrical panel (usually the big pull-out at the top) or ask your installer to verify this for you. The average sized home usually has a 200-amp main breaker, so the maximum amount of electricity your home can consume is 200 amps. Smaller, older homes may have 100 to 150-amp service. It’s very important to get the amp switch to match your homes service panel.

Find out more in our Generator Buying Guide – look through our Generators or Contact Us for a free quote on installing a new backup power system right away.

Choosing a Portable Emergency Generator

Choosing a Portable Emergency Generator

For Florida residents a backup power source is more than a luxury – after a major storm it’s a necessity!  We quickly forget how much we rely on electricity until it’s gone. If a home standby generator is not in your budget, converting a portable generator into an emergency backup power system is a step in the right direction. You can try to calculate your exact wattage requirements, or you can simply select one of four sizes: Small, Medium, Large or X-Large.

Small Emergency Generators
Small, easily portable generators of 1,000-2,500 watts are commonly used during large outages but they have severe limitations. Small generators can typically only power one or two appliances at a time and may not be able to power more than a fan and some lights. Small generators are good for camping but are not good for powering a home.

Medium Emergency Generators
Medium generators of 3,000-5,000 watts may be relatively small, but they will restore power to most of your critical appliances, like the refrigerator, sump pump, ac/furnace fan, lights, etc. But keep in mind; mid-sized generators will not power your entire home, and they will not run a central air conditioner. These require extension cords and the number of outlets are important.

Since medium generators produce limited electricity, you’ll need to manage how many appliances are connected to the generator at one time, so it doesn’t overload. If two appliances start simultaneously the electric surge could pop the generator’s circuit breaker. Your best bet is to rotate the larger appliances or only plug them in as needed. Small window-unit or portable AC’s may sometimes be run (depending on its listed wattage) but only by themselves.

Large Emergency Generators
If you want to do more than just survive, consider a large emergency portable generator (6,000-9,000 watts). You can still string extension cords from this generator, but you won’t be able to tap its full potential without connecting it to your home with a transfer switch.

Large generators work best with manual transfer switches that can restore power up to 10 circuits in your main electrical panel. In other words, they can energize multiple rooms in your home (minus a central air conditioner). If you really need air conditioning, consider buying an X-Large generator, buying a small window-unit or portable AC to run only during power outages, or opting for a home standby generator.

X-Large Emergency Generators
If you want the strength of a home standby generator with the ability to run a whole house, get an X-Large portable generator of 10,000+ watts. They are large and require a good amount of storage space, but when properly matched, these behemoths can generate enough power to keep your central air conditioner running during a summer outage.

While electric start is standard on most X-Large models, they are NOT automatic. They must be manually started and require a transfer switch of the correct wattage to connect to your home. It is very important you get a generator with the correct wattage if you plan to run your central AC.

If you have a large home or would like to have standby power that will automatically start up and switch over in the event of an outage, you should really consider a home standby generator.

How can you tell what size generator you need? Look at your air conditioning unit’s data plate and it will tell you the size in either BTUs or Tons. There are 12,000 BTUs for each ton of capacity and 3.517 Kilowatts of energy. So, for example, if you have a 3-ton (36,000BTU) air conditioner, it will require a standby generator that is 11kW or larger just to run the AC unit. (3T x 3.517kw = 10.551 or 11kw). Be sure to add-in the power needs of your home as well to calculate the correct generator wattage, plus a little extra to cover power surges.

Call 1 Stop Generator Shop today to answer all of your backup-power questions. Shop our Portable Generators here.

How to prepare for a Hurricane or Tropical Storm

How to prepare for a Hurricane or Tropical Storm

Before the Storm: What Can You Do To Protect Your Home?

Cover The Windows

If you live in an area vulnerable to hurricanes, consider installing storm shutters. They are available in several different types, and they will go a long way toward keeping the damaging wind and rain from entering through your home’s windows. As a side benefit, they may reduce your homeowner’s insurance premium.

Secure The Doors

Steel entry doors provide the best protection for your home. Double doors and French doors are most vulnerable to high winds. No matter what type of door you have, a hurricane panel is your best option to keep damage at a minimum. These galvanized steel or PVC panels are available at your local hardware store. You can also nail plywood over your doors to help keep out water and debris. Do not nail yourself inside the house, in case you need to evacuate the area on short notice.

If you have double doors that have no structural member in the center between them, you should purchase and install special hardware to secure the doors where they meet. Bolts that secure the door into the framing at both the top and bottom greatly increase the door’s strength. Wedge a dowel or a piece of broom handle into the track of sliding glass doors to prevent them from coming loose when the wind howls.

Provide stiffening support for garage doors. The pressure from wind increases with the door’s size, and wide doors in particular need bracing for stability during high winds. Make your own vertical supports by nailing two 2x4s together and attaching them to the inside of your garage door with “L” brackets.

Keep the Yard Clear of Flying Debris

Flying tree limbs pose a great danger during high winds. Trim trees to avoid the possibility of large limbs doing damage to your house. In addition, selectively thinning out the branches to allow wind to pass through will reduce the potential for damage to the tree itself. Dead or damaged branches should be removed before they become flying missiles aimed straight for your house.

Develop a Family Hurricane Plan

Discuss the types of hazards that could affect your family.  Know your home’s vulnerability to storm surge, flooding and wind.

  1. Secure your home (doors and windows).
  2. Locate a SAFE ROOM or the SAFE AREAS in the home for each hurricane hazard.
  3. Determine safe escape routes and meeting places prior to the storm
  4. Have an out-of-state friend as a family contact, so all your family members have a single point of contact.
  5. Make arrangements prior to the storm for pets in case of mandatory evacuation.
  6. Gather all non-emergency phone numbers and discuss the proper use of 911 with all children.
  7. 7.  Prepare a Family First Aid Kit and put it in the SAFE ROOM.
  8. 8.  Have a battery-operated radio for weather and safety updates.

 Prepare a Disaster Supply Kit:

  • Water (1 gallon per person for 3 to 7 days)
  • Food (3 to 7 day supply for each person)
  • non-perishable packaged or canned food/juices
  • foods for infants or elderly individuals
  • snack foods
  • non-electric can opener
  • cooking tools/fuel
  • paper plates/plastic utensils
  • Blankets/Pillows, etc.
  • Clothing
  • First Aid Kit/Medicines/Prescription Drugs
  • Special Items
  • Toiletries/Hygiene items/Moisture wipes
  • Flashlight/Batteries
  • Radio (battery operated)
  • Cash
  • Keys
  • Toys/Books/Games for children
  • Important documents – waterproof container:
  • birth certificates
  • insurance documents
  • medical records
  • bank account information
  • pictures
  • Tools
  • Vehicle fuel tanks filled
  • Pet care items (If not going to shelter)

Despite the best attempts at protecting your home, damage may still occur. Take a look at your insurance policies to make sure you are adequately covered. Keep lists, pictures and video of your belongings as documentation for the insurance company.

Helpful Websites for information and safety
Link to NOAA: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/ 
Link to Generac’s Hurricane Preparedness’ Guide: http://www.generac.com/hurricane-prep
Florida’s disaster prep site:  www.floridadisaster.org
Get alerts for your county/city:  floridadisaster.org/alertflorida
Get a plan!  www.floridadisaster.org/getaplan
Florida DOT:  www.fdot.gov/emergencymanagement
Florida State Emergency Response team on Twitter:  twitter.com/FLSERT
Volunteer Information:  www.volunteerflorida.org/emergency-management

Hurricane Tips for Horse Owners

Hurricane Tips for Horse Owners

Horses should be kept on the owner’s or caretaker’s property, if possible. If you plan to evacuate your animal out of the area, go early.

  • In a Category 1 storm, animals may be safe in a sturdy barn. In a Category 2 storm or higher, animals are probably safest in a large pasture with room to move around,allowing them to utilize their best instincts if there are no electrical wires to come down and the fences are in good repair.
  • Do NOT tranquilize your horse!
  • Make sure your animal is well identified by spray painting your phone number on your horse’s body; attach a fetlock band or mare band with your name address and phone numbers in permanent ink; braid a luggage tag into your horses mane or tail close to the body (be sure its water proofed).
  • Be sure to have photos of you with your animals, showing any unique markings, to prove ownership.
  • Be sure that your horse is wearing a leather halter which will make it easier for someone to catch your horse if it gets loose.
  • Plan for water (20 gallons per animal per day) and feed and hay for your horse.
  • Have on hand a supply of basic first aid items, i.e., bandages, anesthetics, etc.
  • Do not stay with your horse! You cannot help a frightened, thousand pound animal, and you may get hurt.

IF UNDER A FLOOD WATCH, the following reminders are also important:

  • Move your large animals to high ground.
  • Cleanse feet and hooves with iodine. Once the iodine dries, the feet and hooves should be covered with Vaseline or petroleum jelly for protection from standing water and infection.
  • Feed and hay should be moved above ground three feet to avoid water damage and mold.

IN BROWARD COUNTY, caretakers and/or horse owners should contact the Broward County Hurricane Hotline at 3-1-1 or 954-831-4000 if the horse is in standing water up to their knees post-storm.